The Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension, like the TLC described earlier, is endorsed by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Association, the American Heart Association, and the 2015 Dietary Guide for Americans. It was developed with the purpose of helping people reduce blood pressure, prioritize the consumption of calcium, potassium, and magnesium, and, most importantly, abstain from sodium.

Very few diet plans outlive temporary fads and trends, and WW is definitely one of them. The diet company formerly known as Weight Watchers has kept up with the times by reinventing and rebranding itself as WW, which stands for “Weight Loss & Wellness.”  While the company’s diet approach is still based on the Smart Points food-tracking system, it has recently incorporated meditations, audio workouts, food logging, Zero-Point foods, a redesigned app, and online support for a more holistic approach to dieting.


"It's far more difficult to eat a healthier diet and fit in exercise if you don't plan ahead. Plan out your meals for the week ahead and go grocery shopping over the weekend to ensure you have the ingredients you need on hand. If you can, do some meal prep in your downtime—cut fresh veggies, marinate your protein, cook up a batch of whole grains in advance. When you're prepared you're far less likely to order takeout. — Jessica Fishman Levinson, MS, RDN, CDN, culinary-nutrition consultant and founder of Nutritioulicious
Popularized by the documentary Forks Over Knives, the Ornish diet is a low-fat, plant-based diet plan based on whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and legumes. It's based on a lacto-ovo style of vegetarianism, allowing only egg whites and nonfat dairy products. It's packed with vitamins, fiber, and lots of filling plants to keep you satiated. Some studies have shown it can reverse heart disease and have beneficial effects on other chronic health conditions. (BTW, there is a difference between a vegan diet and a plant-based diet.) 
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