Okay, I am a bit confused now, can you explain further? I was all on board with some of your other posts, mainly where you indicate that the best workout to maintain strength in a deficit is through strength training; you indicated that it may not be the most efficient at burning fat, but that it will certainly maintain the absolute most amount of muscle, while letting a caloric deficit to take care of fat loss (this is exactly what I have been focusing on, it seemed quite logical). In regards to hard strength training, focusing on low-moderate reps, I am still finding myself tired, worn out, fatigued, etc. at the same rate as my previous training cycles – in which I was deloading every 4th week – in other words, “working my ass off” as you state in your other post. So, maybe a little more explanation is needed here to clarify for me. Isn’t a deload every 4th (maybe 6th) week suggested even if your strength training focus is down in the 4-8 rep range? I would think that the need for a deload is associated more with the effort you expend in the gym, not what you eat outside of the gym – or even the progress in the gym. Further (with absolutely no consideration for science or anything else – so I could be way off) it even seems to me, that when your body is in a deficit and you are focusing on strength training, maybe the need for a deload would be more apparent (from a symptom standpoint, joint health, fatigue, etc.). No? Thoughts?
He's laughing at you - all of you, and he knows that all he has to do is stay fat and you'll loving care for him. Being fat is his job but when he gets bored with it - and he will, you will be the ones he blames.Nobody forced him to become the pig he is. if you pander to him he will just continue. He isn't ill, and definitely not stupid. He doesn't deserve compassion but desperately needs tough love.Kick him out on the street, he's had enough free service now it's time to pick up the tab.If he lives, he lives - if he dies, dies. I, nor anybody else truly cares
The root of the problem is not willpower but neuroscience. Metabolic suppression is one of several powerful tools that the brain uses to keep the body within a certain weight range, called the set point. The range, which varies from person to person, is determined by genes and life experience. When dieters’ weight drops below it, they not only burn fewer calories but also produce more hunger-inducing hormones and find eating more rewarding.

In the laboratory, rodents learn to binge when deprivation alternates with tasty food — a situation familiar to many dieters. Rats develop binge eating after several weeks consisting of five days of food restriction followed by two days of free access to Oreos. Four days later, a brief stressor leads them to eat almost twice as many Oreos as animals that received the stressor but did not have their diets restricted. A small taste of Oreos can induce deprived animals to binge on regular chow, if nothing else is available. Repeated food deprivation changes dopamine and other neurotransmitters in the brain that govern how animals respond to rewards, which increases their motivation to seek out and eat food. This may explain why the animals binge, especially as these brain changes can last long after the diet is over.
Crash dieting can backfire and actually make it harder to lose weight—not to mention increase the chance you'll gain it back when you start eating again. At the same time, if you're cutting out calories without assessing and ensuring you're still eating the right ones, "you actually stop losing weight," Cederquist says. You can also feel weak, lightheaded and fatigued, like you're running off fumes. Not exactly the best motivation to hit the gym.
Water is great for health, but it’s even better when you are trying to lose weight and flatten your stomach. This is because when you drink enough water, you are actually helping your system to maintain proper water balance which helps in reducing water retention, a major cause of bloated bellies. Water also makes us feel full and reduces overeating.
The first help achieving flat tummy may be to remove all the processed food from your property. Replace the processed food with nutrient packed up and fiber wealthy food like fresh fruits, vegetables, poultry, toned beef, whole grains, low-fat dairy, beans, nuts, signs etc. Do not retail store hot dogs and sausages or candy bars on your property. Avoid all carbohydrate food for any first day. Start drinking 10-12 decanter or glass of water to cleanse your components and to take away the fat from your system. You can additionally try fasting with regard to one- to three days before you start the effort for any flat tummy. Challenging fasting take just 3-5 apple cider white vinegar drinks.

It’s natural for anyone trying to lose weight to want to lose it very quickly. But evidence shows that people who lose weight gradually and steadily (about 1 to 2 pounds per week) are more successful at keeping weight off. Healthy weight loss isn’t just about a “diet” or “program”. It’s about an ongoing lifestyle that includes long-term changes in daily eating and exercise habits.
Bariatric surgery, an operation on the stomach and intestine used to treat obesity, may be an option for people who are still severely obese after attempting to lose weight through other methods, such as diet and exercise. People with a BMI of 40 or greater, or those with a BMI of 35 or greater who also have obesity-related health conditions (such as type 2 diabetes), are candidates for this invasive surgery, according to the NIH.
The scale is not necessarily your friend. You may want to lose fat – but the scale measures muscles, bone and internal organs as well. Gaining muscle is a good thing. Thus weight or BMI are imperfect ways to measure your progress. This is especially true if you’re just coming off a long period of semi-starvation (calorie counting), as your body may want to restore lost muscles etc. Starting weight training and gaining muscle can also hide your fat loss.
As an alternative to eating a reduced-calorie diet every day, some people try to do "intermittent fasting." This means they significantly cut their calories on a few days per week and eat normally the other days. This diet is generally not recommended, but early research suggests that some people may find it easier to follow this diet than a traditional one, Tallmadge said. A review study published in April 2015 found that people on intermittent-fasting diets lost about 9 percent of their body weight over six months, and about 80 percent of the participants were able to stick with the diet.

Still, some people may be so focused on losing weight that they end up losing too much, including muscle mass. Unfortunately, this is inevitable, Dr. Grunvald said. "Any time you lose weight, you're going to lose approximately a quarter to a third in body mass, so you can't get around [losing muscle]," he explained. To minimize this, he recommends resistance training throughout the weight-loss process and eating adequate amounts of protein, about 15 percent of your daily calories.
Stress wreaks havoc on every part of your body, and can lead to breakouts, joint pain, headaches, and yes, even excess belly fat. That’s because when you’re stressed, your body pumps out extra cortisol, that not-so-great hormone you keep hearing about. Studies show that cortisol not only spikes your appetite, but may also redistribute body fat to your belly area, according to a review published in the journal Obesity.
“Research continues to support the role of a high-protein diet and weight loss, however, we don’t want to reach those protein needs exclusively with animal proteins. Plant proteins found in beans not only help us feel full and stabilize blood sugar but beans are associated with longevity. Who cares about being skinny if you die young?” —Jennifer McDaniel, MS, RDN, CSSD, LD, food and nutrition expert
A well-stocked pantry can be a great tool for healthy eating. Most items found in your pantry will be shelf stable and easy to keep on hand over longer periods of time. Try keeping items like these for quick and healthy meals: canned beans, no-salt-added canned vegetables, canned tuna or chicken, 100% whole grains (like quinoa, 100% whole wheat pasta, or brown rice), nut butters, and low-calorie and low-sodium soups.
that lists sugar, fructose, or corn syrup among the first four ingredients on the label. You should be able to find a lower-sugar version of the same type of food. If you can’t, grab a piece of fruit instead! Look for sugar-free varieties of foods such as ketchup, mayonnaise, and salad dressing. Also, avoid partially hydrogenated foods, and look for more than two grams of fiber per 100 calories in all grain products. Finally, a short ingredient list means fewer flavor enhancers and empty calories.
Earlier, belly fat was considered healthy; it was perceived as a reservoir of adipose tissues that could be utilized when a person needed extra energy. With time, the views have changed. Researchers state that excess belly fat triggers chronic cardiovascular diseases. So, it is important to measure belly fat and check how much you need to reduce. Here are some parameters to measure your waistline.

Some antidepressant medications can cause weight gain, especially the older tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) such as Tryptizol, Saroten, and Clomipramine; as well as newer drugs such as Remeron (Mirtazapine). Lithium (for manic-depressive disorder) often causes weight gain. The most common antidepressants known as SSRI’s (for example Citalopram and Sertraline) usually don’t impact weight significantly. More on depression
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