Hi Rachael, im a little confused if i should only do body weight exercises as in your program and walking and running or if i need to do HIIT and more resistant training to lose body weight as you seem to have recommended to lose body percentage. I want to avoid getting to bulky which i have tendancy to do with alot of that style of training. My aim is to lose 6-7%body percentage lean out and decrease body measurements. Thankyou.
Weight training is the ultimate way to burn calories fast. "A pound of muscle burns up to nine times the calories of a pound of fat," explains Richard Cotton, M.A., chief exercise physiologist for myexerciseplan.com. Weight training increases your resting metabolic rate, which is the number of calories you burn while sitting on your butt. What's more, it gives your metabolism an added boost after you exercise, staying in overdrive for up to two hours after the last bench press, according to a study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Strapped for time? Try these quick moves: squats, bench step-ups, lunges, push-ups, pull-ups and planks. In a pinch, just do single sets of 10 for each exercise — you'll get optimal results for the time invested.
1. The side plank exercise is the best way to reduce belly fat. There are only two points of contact with the floor which helps the core muscles to contract even harder. Lie on your side with your legs top of each other, rest on your lower forearm that is bent on the elbow. Force your upper body off the floor by using your forearm and place other hand on your hips. You should resemble a diagonal line from head to toe. After you lift your bodies just hold it for 30-60 seconds.

We wanted to know what these studies found and, most importantly, when all the science and evidence were boiled down, what experts recommend for people who would like to shed pounds in a safe, healthy manner. All of the experts emphasized one thing: A person's approach to weight loss should be one that is enjoyable and can be maintained over the long term. Weight loss shouldn't be about deprivation, because diets that deprive people of their favorite foods tend to be short-lived, said Dr. Pieter Cohen, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and general internist at Cambridge Health Alliance. 

25. Try An Outdoor Activity – There are a ton of benefits that come when you take your workout outdoors – stress reduction, improved mood, increased self-esteem, and greater exercise adherence.29 If you live near water, try kayaking, stand-up paddleboard, surfing, or rowing. In mountainous areas, try bouldering, rock climbing, or hiking. And in cities, join a recreational sports league.


The conclusion? Intermittent fasting was just as effective for weight loss as daily calorie restriction. So if you struggle with daily food restriction, fasting might be an easier way to dial back the amount you’re eating without feeling completely deprived. Read more in-depth about how intermittent fasting works (and if you’ll be able to stick to it) here.


Call it what you will: An eating plan, a lifestyle, a diet, a philosophy, but few things garner such heated debate as how to lose weight. The truth is, whether you’re on a low-carb keto program, devoted to the Paleo lifestyle, all in to the Whole 30 or remain committed to low-fat eating, these plans have more in common than you think. What’s more, follow any one of them religiously, and you’ll likely notice results.
Replace high-calorie foods with filling, low-calorie options. Since you’re consuming fewer calories, you might be worried that you won’t get full. However, it’s the amount of food you eat that makes you full, not the number of calories. Fruit and vegetables contain fewer calories than junk food, and they’re packed with water and fiber, which help make you feel full.[8]
Wonderful! I hate cardio. I have created a caloric deficit of about 500 calories, so I think I’m just going to do about 30 min of cardio on the days I don’t weight train. I think being at the gym once a day (5 or 6 days a week) helps my motivation. I have a treadmill at home but I don’t feel the same on it as I do in the gym surrounded by other fitness minded people. Looking forward to the cardio articles! BTW, an article on correct form for some basic exercises would be great for us beginners as well!
24. Try A Group Fitness Class – Are you competitive? Do you work out harder when other people are around? Group fitness classes are a great way to get motivated, challenge yourself, and meet active people. Try boxing or muay thai, TRX, brazilian jiu jitsu, salsa dancing, parkour, rock climbing, and fitness bootcamps. In bigger cities, you could even try circus classes or train like an American Ninja Warrior. Find a class you like and go to it every week.
Okay, I am a bit confused now, can you explain further? I was all on board with some of your other posts, mainly where you indicate that the best workout to maintain strength in a deficit is through strength training; you indicated that it may not be the most efficient at burning fat, but that it will certainly maintain the absolute most amount of muscle, while letting a caloric deficit to take care of fat loss (this is exactly what I have been focusing on, it seemed quite logical). In regards to hard strength training, focusing on low-moderate reps, I am still finding myself tired, worn out, fatigued, etc. at the same rate as my previous training cycles – in which I was deloading every 4th week – in other words, “working my ass off” as you state in your other post. So, maybe a little more explanation is needed here to clarify for me. Isn’t a deload every 4th (maybe 6th) week suggested even if your strength training focus is down in the 4-8 rep range? I would think that the need for a deload is associated more with the effort you expend in the gym, not what you eat outside of the gym – or even the progress in the gym. Further (with absolutely no consideration for science or anything else – so I could be way off) it even seems to me, that when your body is in a deficit and you are focusing on strength training, maybe the need for a deload would be more apparent (from a symptom standpoint, joint health, fatigue, etc.). No? Thoughts?
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