What’s your take on Gary Taubes’ work (if you’ve read it)? He hates the calorie in/out concept but from reading it that’s mainly because it doesn’t address causality (and he doesn’t believe everybody that’s obese/overweight is just lazy/stupid). As I understand it he specifically he says insulin levels regulate how easily fat is stored and available to be burned off and affects how hungry we get. Is that wrong?
If not bothersome I’d like to ask you a specific question that I don’t believe I’ve seen on your website. I know the sole factor of fat loss is calorie deficit and am happy with the weight loss I’ve achieved in the past 9 weeks. I will attend a friend’s wedding for a week next week and don’t imagine I will be able to maintain my current diet. I’ve read from other sources discussing how you should “SLOWLY” increase your calorie consumption to avoid your body storing fat. I will certainly not eat 4,000 calories during my trip but my question will be if it’s OK for me to jump back to “maintenance level” calorie consumption or you would recommend me doing “15% Deficit on Day 1, 10% Deficit on Day 2…etc.”?

"It’s important to remember that not all calories are created equal when it comes to providing your body with the nutritional foundation for weight loss," Cederquist says. The calories you are eating should come from macronutrients like lean protein, healthy fat, and whole grains. If you're cutting the number of calories, but only eating processed, sugary foods, your body won't be getting the fuel it needs to run efficiently. "I find that for most people, starting with an analysis of their protein intake is the best place to start when cutting or replacing calories." Eating lean protein is essential to preserve lean muscle mass as you lose weight, and to keep your metabolism chugging along. Other healthy nutrients like fats and whole grains will help keep you satiated and decrease the chance you'll feel starving and be tempted to binge on empty calories (read: sugar).


Finding the ideal amount of protein to eat can be tricky. The Institute of Medicine says the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA)—how much you need to avoid deficiency—of protein for adults should be 0.8 g/kg body weight. To calculate it, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2, then multiply by 0.8. But when you're trying to lose weight, your protein needs may change. Some research suggests doubling lean protein intake to help assist weight loss and prevent muscle mass loss. Cederquist recommends: "For a woman of average height (which in the United States is 5'4") I recommend 110–120 grams of protein per day," or about 4 ounces at each meal. "This is the equivalent of a small chicken breast—not an enormous burger or steak!" Before doubling up on protein, talk to a registered dietitian to make sure it's safe for you.
Studies found that people who keep food diaries wind up eating about 15 percent less food than those who don’t. Watch out for weekends: A University of North Carolina study found people tend to consume an extra 115 calories per weekend day, primarily from alcohol and fat. (Though good news: You can work out only on weekends and still lose weight.) Then cut out or down calories from spreads, dressings, sauces, condiments, drinks, and snacks; they could make the difference between weight gain and loss. Don’t miss these other tricks for stopping weekend weight gain.
Everyone knows that good things come to those who wait, but sometimes you don’t want to wait. Like, for instance, when you’re waiting for the number on the scale to creep down, whether it’s because you have a big reunion in a month, you’re headed to the beach in just two weeks, or your friend just confessed your ex is going to be at that party next weekend. Whatever the reason, it’s not wrong to want to lose weight fast. But you do want to do it in a way that’s healthy, and that won’t guarantee the pounds come right back as soon as you resume your usual diet and exercise habits. That’s why two experts weighed in on the fastest way to lose weight, no sketchy shortcuts required. (PS: This Is the Fad Diet and Weight Loss Advice That Simply Doesn’t Work.)
What’s more, your body digests protein more slowly than carbs, so it keeps you feeling fuller longer and zaps your need to needlessly snack. “During weight loss, you want more protein—to prevent hunger, enhance satiety, and minimize muscle loss, as long as there’s some degree of physical activity,” Tom Rifai, MD, regional medical director of metabolic health and weight management for the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit told Prevention.
“Stepping on the scale frequently makes you aware of small changes and helps you quickly react to those changes. The National Weight Control Registry, a large group of people who have successfully lost at least 30 pounds and kept it off for 5 years, found that successful ‘losers’ weigh themselves often and make adjustments accordingly. When you begin to understand that sodium, carb intake, hormones and alcohol intake can impact weight and that it isn’t possible to gain 2 pounds of fat overnight, you will begin to better understand your body. The key is to pay attention to overall trends; don’t obsess over day-to-day numbers! — Jennifer McDaniel, MS, RDN, CSSD, LD, food and nutrition expert
Not in an extreme, Atkins sort of way, but having a little protein at every meal fires up your metabolism. "Your digestive system uses more energy to break it down, so you burn more calories," explains Lisa Dorfman, R.D. However, keep protein levels to between 20 and 35 percent of your diet; eating too much of it can cause kidney strain and may cause your body to store too much fat.
Obesity is a growing problem in the United States. Over the past 15 years, the nation's obesity rate rose by 24 percent (7.2 percentage points) among adults, from 30.5 percent in the years 1999-2000 to 37.7 percent in 2013-2014, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published in November 2015. The adult obesity rate in 2013-2014 was the highest ever for the nation, and equates to more than 78 million people.

Overall I do not recommend this book. While it provides some okay information buried in the words somewhere, this is a lot of common knowledge and you can find it online all over the place free. I've found all of this info and more on Spark People, which is a free community. The book is misleading, judgemental, makes generalizations about people who are obese, and tries to sell you something at every turn. I would skip this book and seek out a free resource that will offer you everything this book has to offer and more, plus in a non-judgemental tone.
5 Tips to Quick Weight Loss That Make You Look Slim and Elegant: Losing weight has been the problem of many these days. But losing weight can be as simple as driving a car if you know the right way to do it. In fact, reaching your weight-loss goals may be easier than you think if you can follow the weight loss tips I will explain in this article.. So if you have been frustrated because you never seem to reach your weight loss goal or stay at your goal weight, one reason may be that you have not yet learned how to set goals with any degree of specialty, or you've aimed for unrealistic stuff that you couldn't reach no matter how hard you tried.. Here are 5 tips that will make you lose weight... Continued In This Link :http://bit.ly/QApopy and good luck
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Even people who understand the difficulty of long-term weight loss often turn to dieting because they are worried about health problems associated with obesity like heart disease and diabetes. But our culture’s view of obesity as uniquely deadly is mistaken. Low fitness, smoking, high blood pressure, low income and loneliness are all better predictors of early death than obesity. Exercise is especially important: Data from a 2009 study showed that low fitness is responsible for 16 percent to 17 percent of deaths in the United States, while obesity accounts for only 2 percent to 3 percent, once fitness is factored out. Exercise reduces abdominal fat and improves health, even without weight loss. This suggests that overweight people should focus more on exercising than on calorie restriction.

The final possible culprit behind stubborn weight issues may be the stress hormone, cortisol. Too much cortisol will increase hunger levels, bringing along subsequent weight gain. The most common cause of elevated cortisol is chronic stress and lack of sleep (see tip #10), or cortisone medication (tip #9). It’s a good idea to try your best to do something about this.
It's typically harder to keep weight off than it is to lose it, the experts agreed. Many studies show that people usually experience their maximum weight loss after about six months of a diet-and-exercise program. After that, the pounds come creeping back, although most people don't regain all of the weight. For example, a 2007 review of 80 diet studies involving more than 26,000 people found that dieters lost about 11 to 19 lbs. (5 to 8.5 kg) after six months, but then their weight loss plateaued, and after four years, they maintained about 6.5 to 13 lbs. (3 to 6 kg) of weight loss.
“If I had to pick one food for weight loss, I would choose oatmeal. It’s a whole grain, high-fiber carbohydrate that sticks to your ribs, so it keeps you full and satisfied. Eating it also leads to a slow rise in blood sugar, which has been shown to keep insulin levels from spiking, leading to less fat storage. The key with oatmeal is how to make it so it’s not a calorie bomb. I recommend making it with nonfat milk in place of water, stirring in chopped raw nuts or natural nut butter, and topping with fresh or frozen fruits. If you need some added sweetness, a drizzle of maple syrup should do it. — Jessica Fishman Levinson, MS, RDN, CDN, culinary-nutrition consultant and founder of Nutritioulicious
While diet plays an important role in helping you lose weight, exercising is an essential part of weight-loss. If you want to know how to lose weight, perform resistance training on a regular basis. According to a study from the Harvard School of Public Health, an increased weight training in adult male subjects’ workouts considerably reduced their risk of abdominal obesity through a multi-year period of study. On the other hand, the same amount of cardio during that period had no effect. Weight training can even boost your rate of metabolism. According to a research from University of Maryland, 16 weeks of weight training led a 7.7 per cent increase in metabolic rates in subjects, which stimulated belly fat loss.
Say cheese! Adding some extra calcium to your diet could be the key to getting that flat stomach you’ve been dreaming about. Over just 12 months, researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville found that obese female study subjects who upped their calcium intake shed 11 pounds of body fat without other major dietary modifications. To keep your calcium choices healthy, try mixing it up between dairy sources, calcium-rich leafy greens, fatty fish, nuts, and seeds.
One of the best plank variations involves crawling. This exercise routine helps you tone your abs, back, and shoulders. Crawls are designed to use the upper and lower body in unison. To do a plank crawl you need to get in a pushup position, then lowering yourself down into the plank position by balancing on your forearms, elbows and toes. Now balance on one arm the come back to your initial push-up position, repeat the process by alternating the arm. You have to maintain a straight body during the exercise routine. Plank is commonly practiced in Pilates and yoga. You can decrease the difficulty level by lowering your knees to the floor.
“Even though a smart diet is key, exercise can help boost your body’s metabolism to shed fat. Through health care providers often recommend brisk walking or jogging, these exercises may not help you see the results you want. Instead, try interval training. Here’s how: While performing your usual walking or jogging routine, intersperse faster paces periodically throughout your workout. In other words, you may be walking at your normal pace for 2 minutes and then begin a slow jog or fast walk for 1 minute. After the faster speed, return to your slower speed and continue this alternation for 20 minutes. Research shows this type of exercise can stimulate metabolism, melt fat and push your fitness status to the next level.” — Dr. Sean M. Wells, DPT, PT, OCS, ATC/L, CSCS Owner and PT, Naples Personal Training, LLC
Liz Applegate, director of sports nutrition at the University of California, Davis, said she recommends a diet that is about 20 percent protein (about 60 to 70 grams, or 2 to 2.5 ounces, per day), spread across all three meals. This recommendation agrees with findings from a study of people in the National Weight Control Registry who have lost at least 30 lbs. (13.6 kg) and kept it off for at least a year. An analysis of 900 people in this registry showed that about 18 to 20 percent of their daily calories came from protein. This would be the equivalent of eating 6 ounces of Greek yogurt at breakfast (17 grams of protein), 3 ounces of salmon for lunch (21 grams of protein) 1 ounce of nuts for a snack (7 grams of protein) and 3 ounces of chicken for dinner (19 grams of protein).
But it's important to remember that "fat" doesn't mean "unhealthy." Yes, women have larger fat stores, but it's part of their physiology, meaning it's not extra weight. So if a woman has 11 percent more body fat than a man, it doesn't mean she's 11 percent "fatter." A perfectly fit woman will still hold six to 11 percent more body fat than a perfectly fit man.
According to a study, people who snoozed past 10.45 am were more likely to consume 250 extra calories in their meals throughout the day. Additionally they leaned towards sugary, salty and trans-fat laden foods as compared to their early bird counterparts. Researchers from Northwestern University revealed that early risers received an additional metabolic boost and people who were exposed to just a short period of early morning sunlight had lower BMI compared to people who woke up late.

“If I had to pick one food for weight loss, I would choose oatmeal. It’s a whole grain, high-fiber carbohydrate that sticks to your ribs, so it keeps you full and satisfied. Eating it also leads to a slow rise in blood sugar, which has been shown to keep insulin levels from spiking, leading to less fat storage. The key with oatmeal is how to make it so it’s not a calorie bomb. I recommend making it with nonfat milk in place of water, stirring in chopped raw nuts or natural nut butter, and topping with fresh or frozen fruits. If you need some added sweetness, a drizzle of maple syrup should do it. — Jessica Fishman Levinson, MS, RDN, CDN, culinary-nutrition consultant and founder of Nutritioulicious

Use MyPlate’s calculator to find your recommended daily caloric intake at https://www.choosemyplate.gov/MyPlate-Daily-Checklist-input. Enter your age, sex, height, weight, and activity level. The calculator will list how many calories you should consume to maintain your current weight and how many you should cut from your diet to get to a healthy weight.


Answer . \nI don't know your situation, but I do know - and I'm pretty sure you know, that starving yourself is not the best way to lose weight. You need to do some exercise every day, drink heaps of water, and eat healthy food. There are a multitude of good diets out there you can try without resorting to starving yourself. Starving will leave you weak, dehydrated, and maybe even make your stomach lining get eaten away in the process. Don't do it!. Answer . In two months, you would be dead.


This could be because the body increases insulin secretion in anticipation that sugar will appear in the blood. When this doesn’t happen, blood sugar drops and hunger increases. Whether this chain of events regularly takes place is somewhat unclear. Something odd happened when I tested Pepsi Max though, and there are well-designed studies showing increased insulin when using artificial sweeteners.