First, be careful of fad diets that promise 10-15 pounds of weight loss in a month. Such claims are often false. Further, liquid diets and cleanses often are unsafe, because they do not give you the nutrients you need, and most have serious side effects. And finally, fad diets are generally unreliable-- you may indeed lose a lot of "water weight" but the chances are you will soon gain it back again. Most dietitians will tell you that you should aim for losing a pound a week, which means 4-5 pounds in a month. This may not sound like much, but it gives your body a chance to adjust and get accustomed to a new regimen of eating less. There are no magic pills, contrary to ads you may have seen. Some diet products you can find in a pharmacy (like Alli ) do indeed help you to lose weight more quickly, but as I said, they may have serious side effects. You are better off choosing a weight-loss program like Weight Watchers and using a combination of eating less, avoiding junk food, getting exercise, and working with a dietitian to find the right kind of nutritious, low-calorie meals. Slowly and steadily, you will lose the weight and keep it off.
“There are many foods that aid weight loss, but one that I often recommend to my clients and eat myself is grapefruit. Researchers at Scripps Clinic in San Diego found that when obese people ate half a grapefruit before each meal, they dropped an average of 3.5 pounds over 12 weeks. Apparently, the tangy fruit can lower insulin, a fat-storage hormone, and that can lead to weight loss. Plus, since it’s at least 90% water, it can fill you up so you eat less. However, if you are on certain medications you should not have grapefruit or grapefruit juice, so check the label on all your prescriptions, or ask your pharmacist or doctor. — Patricia Bannan, MS, RDN, author of  Eat Right When Time is Tight.
This study took 16 overweight men and women and split them into 2 groups. They then had each person in each group create the same sized caloric deficit and then consume that same calorie intake every day for 8 weeks. HOWEVER, they had one group eat 3 meals a day, and the other group eat 6 meals a day. Guess what happened? They all lost the same amount of weight. In fact, the study showed that there was no difference at all in fat loss, appetite control, or anything similar. Why? Because meal frequency doesn’t affect your ability to lose fat or gain fat. Calories do.
We often make the wrong trade-offs. Many of us make the mistake of swapping fat for the empty calories of sugar and refined carbohydrates. Instead of eating whole-fat yoghurt, for example, we eat low- or no-fat versions that are packed with sugar to make up for the loss of taste. Or we swap our fatty breakfast bacon for a muffin or donut that causes rapid spikes in blood sugar.
The question of how to lose stomach fat in a week cannot be overstated, sure some people may doubt it, but losing belly fat in a week is easily doable and has been done before. When the question of how to lose stomach fat fast is asked, it should be how many pounds, because losing belly in a week, could mean 2 pounds, 4 pounds, or even a pound of belly fat. Whether you're a woman looking for ways on how to burn belly fat, or a man looking for best way to lose belly fat for men, the goal is achievable if you follow the steps mentioned here in this video for steps on how to lose belly fat in one week.
Consider getting some professional weight-loss help. Start by talking with your doctor or your dietitian about developing a weight-loss program that works for you. This can be especially important if you are more than 20% over a healthy weight for your height. It may also be helpful if your BMI is around 30 or more. Depending on your weight-loss goals and health concerns, you may want to ask your healthcare team whether a commercial program might be helpful. One such program is Weight Watchers.

Consult your physician and follow all safety instructions before beginning any exercise program or using any supplement or meal replacement product, especially if you have any unique medical conditions or needs. The contents on our website are for informational purposes only, and are not intended to diagnose any medical condition, replace the advice of a healthcare professional, or provide any medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
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