Diets often do improve cholesterol, blood sugar and other health markers in the short term, but these gains may result from changes in behavior like exercising and eating more vegetables. Obese people who exercise, eat enough vegetables and don’t smoke are no more likely to die young than normal-weight people with the same habits. A 2013 meta-analysis (which combines the results of multiple studies) found that health improvements in dieters have no relationship to the amount of weight they lose.
It seems counterintuitive to drink lots of water when you’re looking to lose weight fast—especially water weight—but staying hydrated is one of the most important steps you can take to lose weight. People often mistake thirst for hunger, so staying hydrated allows you to be more in touch with the times when you are actually hungry, rather than just thirsty. Plus, a lot of good things happen to your body when you drink enough fluids.
Now the book is talking about how being overweight perpetuates even more weight gain because your perception of what you should be gets skewed the more weight you gain. Um, I'd like to see the research that supports this statement. I'm not saying it's not true, but it almost seems like the author's opinion rather than research. I could be wrong, just requesting some supporting documentation, which I haven't found in this book yet on any of the claims.
Español: reducir grasa sin hacer ejercicio, Français: maigrir sans faire de l'exercice, 中文: 在不锻炼的条件下减肥, Русский: похудеть без тренировок, Deutsch: Abnehmen ohne Sport, Italiano: Ridurre il Grasso Senza Fare Attività Fisica, Português: Emagrecer Sem se Exercitar, Nederlands: Afvallen zonder aan sport te doen, العربية: تقليل الدهون بدون ممارسة الرياضة /injects>
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