i guess for some people its not a question of if calorie in calorie out is the only valid route to losing weight, its a matter of how to reduce those damn calories. For some eating mostly protein keeps them fuller and reducing cravings, thereby reducing amount of calories inhaled!!! for others loading up on veggies and avoiding the usual nosh helps reduce the amount eaten. Sometimes its really difficult to depend on willpower to stop us from having that extra loaf!!!!
A different way of viewing weight loss identifies the problem as not one of consuming too many calories, but rather the way the body accumulates fat after consuming carbohydrates—in particular the role of the hormone insulin. When you eat a meal, carbohydrates from the food enter your bloodstream as glucose. In order to keep your blood sugar levels in check, your body always burns off this glucose before it burns off fat from a meal.
To test this idea rigorously, researchers could randomly assign people to worry about their weight, but that is hard to do. One program took the opposite approach, though, helping teenage girls who were unhappy with their bodies to become less concerned about their weight. In a randomized trial, the eBody Project, an online program to fight eating disorders by reducing girls’ desire to be thin, led to less dieting and also prevented future weight gain. Girls who participated in the program saw their weight remain stable over the next two years, while their peers without the intervention gained a few pounds.
Step Away From The Carbs: The science behind weight loss, the recipes to make it happen. Beautiful colour photographs of every breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack and even drinks. Step Away From The Carbs: The science behind weight loss, the recipes to make it happen. Beautiful colour photographs of every breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack and even drinks. eBook: Stephen Thomas, Jane Thomas: Amazon.co.uk: Kindle Store
You may have an apple-shaped or a pear-shaped body structure. Accumulation of fat occurs differently for different people, it actually depends on the body structure. For those whose bodies are pear-shaped, the fat tends to accumulate in the lower part of the body, like the buttocks. But for those whose bodies are apple-shaped, your body tends to store fat around the middle section, thus resulting in fat accumulation around the belly. You must know that there are two types of belly fat – visceral, which accumulates around the abdominal organs, and subcutaneous, which occurs between the skin and abdominal wall.
My question: even if you incorporate weight training or other resistance exercises into your exercise programming, won’t your weight loss almost inevitably involve a percent loss of lean body mass as well as fat? In my experience, if I lose weight strictly by dieting and don’t exercise at all, based on % body fat measurements, about 50% of my weight loss is fat and about 50% is LBM. If I add 45-60 minutes of exercise 4-5 times per week, about 2/3’s moderate-intense eliptical and 1/3 weights/resistance exercise, I can change that ratio from 1:1 to maybe 3:1 (i.e. 75% of the weight loss seems to be fat.) Under ideal conditions, is it possible to completely eliminate muscle loss when losing weight? My interest in this fraction is that it affects the estimate of what my final weight should be to obtain a given % body fat.

Still, some people may be so focused on losing weight that they end up losing too much, including muscle mass. Unfortunately, this is inevitable, Dr. Grunvald said. "Any time you lose weight, you're going to lose approximately a quarter to a third in body mass, so you can't get around [losing muscle]," he explained. To minimize this, he recommends resistance training throughout the weight-loss process and eating adequate amounts of protein, about 15 percent of your daily calories.


Finally, some chapters I have no problems with! Chapter 6 has some good advice on how to create and use a food diary, and not just to record what you're eating, but to find out what your bad habits are so you can start to recognize them and fix them. I'll be honest, I'm not even aware of the bad habits I have related to how I eat (not just what I eat) and this method is actually good advice on how to achieve it without shaming anyone or making assumptions and generalizations! Chapter 7 is all about stopping food cravings with some great advice. Chapter 8 provides some great advice of creating a physical activity habit (throwing the entire without working out part out the window, but hey, what's a little misleading advertising to get you to open the book. I mean, we already discovered that the whole title was a scam when the author promised to help you lose weight fast yet tells you not to lose weight fast). Chapter 9 provides some decent information about nutrition, though I think this is a far bigger topic than what could be covered in a short chapter of a book.
Bird-dog is an excellent exercise to stabilize the lower back (spine) during extremity movement. It works on abs, back, hips and butt. Begin with a hands and knees position (downward dog) with your fingers pointing forward. Make sure that your hands are under your shoulders and knees are under your hips. Slowly stretch your opposite leg and arm almost parallel to the floor. Hold your balance for a few seconds without arching or sagging your back. Return to the initial position slowly and repeat the same alternating sides.
“Eat vegetables before or with meals. Whether you are hungry on your way home or right when you walk in the door, snacking on veggies can help you keep your portions in check once you sit down to a meal. I also recommend starting your dinner with a vegetable salad or vegetable soup to fill you up and prevent overeating. — Ilyse Schapiro, MS, RD, CDN, author of  Should I Scoop Out My Bagel?
Try interval training. Interval training is where you do really intense activity for only a short period of time, and then moderate or light intensity work for the majority of the time. Scientists have found, in several studies, that people who do interval training actually end up exercising for shorter periods of time and burning more calories than people who go at medium intensity for their whole workout.[7]
My repeated dieting eventually caught up with me, as this research would predict. When I was in graduate school and under a lot of stress, I started binge eating. I would finish a carton of ice cream or a box of saltines with butter, usually at 3 a.m. The urge to keep eating was intense, even after I had made myself sick. Fortunately, when the stress eased, I was able to stop. At the time, I felt terrible about being out of control, but now I know that binge eating is a common mammalian response to starvation.
The scale is not necessarily your friend. You may want to lose fat – but the scale measures muscles, bone and internal organs as well. Gaining muscle is a good thing. Thus weight or BMI are imperfect ways to measure your progress. This is especially true if you’re just coming off a long period of semi-starvation (calorie counting), as your body may want to restore lost muscles etc. Starting weight training and gaining muscle can also hide your fat loss.
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