There's no magic number or one-size-fits-all recommendation, but doing a few calculations can give you an idea of how many calories you should eat for weight loss. First, figure out your basal metabolic rate (BMR), which is how many calories your body burns at rest, by just keeping basic functions running (like breathing). Experts use a formula called the Mifflin St. Jeor equation: (10 x your weight in kilograms) + (6.25 x your height in centimeters) – (5 x your age in years) – 161. You can also get your BMR measured at an endocrinologist's office. Then, factor in your activity level—try using this interactive calculator from the United States Department of Agriculture, which will give you a rough estimate of how much you should eat to maintain your current weight considering your BMR and activity level. To lose weight, you need to cut calories from that base number, either by deleting intake or increasing output. "Losing 1 to 2 pounds per week is reasonable, safe, and healthy for most," Cederquist says. Since 1 pound of fat is around 3,500 calories, you'd need to achieve a 500-calorie deficit each day to lose 1 pound each week.
Berries contain antioxidants that help reduce inflammation throughout the body. According to a University of Michigan research, rats who were fed a diet rich in berries, shaved off a substantial amount of belly fat in comparison to a control group. Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries are loaded with resveratrol, the antioxidant pigment which is known to help you lose weight.
The conclusion? A caloric deficit is the sole cause of fat loss. Even if those calories come from the shittiest sources known to mankind, fat will STILL be lost. It’s not the source or the quality of those foods and the calories they provide… it’s the total quantity of it all. (Additional details here: Is Sugar Bad For You? How Much Should You Eat A Day?)
While there are many sources of healthy fats, you need to note that not all fats are healthy. Avoid man-made fats because they increase the bad cholesterol (LDL) in your body system and reduce the good cholesterol. (HDL). All products containing hydrogenated oils have unhealthy fats. Bad fats are present in fried food and other processed meat. Other unhealthy fats are found in animal products, e.g., lard, red meat and butter among others.
Consult your physician and follow all safety instructions before beginning any exercise program or using any supplement or meal replacement product, especially if you have any unique medical conditions or needs. The contents on our website are for informational purposes only, and are not intended to diagnose any medical condition, replace the advice of a healthcare professional, or provide any medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
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