“When clients come to me, many of them have been through the diet wringer. They’ve tried every fad and gimmick and, of course, they’ve failed to maintain long-term success. The key to weight loss is to never feel like you’re on a diet, because diets don’t work. If you feel deprived, you will never make it past a few weeks. The only way to achieve long-term weight loss is to learn to appreciate food as fuel and slowly replaced processed food that cannot properly energize the body with real food that can. After a while this will become second nature and won’t feel like a daily struggle.” — Laura Burak, MS, RD, CDN

“Even though a smart diet is key, exercise can help boost your body’s metabolism to shed fat. Through health care providers often recommend brisk walking or jogging, these exercises may not help you see the results you want. Instead, try interval training. Here’s how: While performing your usual walking or jogging routine, intersperse faster paces periodically throughout your workout. In other words, you may be walking at your normal pace for 2 minutes and then begin a slow jog or fast walk for 1 minute. After the faster speed, return to your slower speed and continue this alternation for 20 minutes. Research shows this type of exercise can stimulate metabolism, melt fat and push your fitness status to the next level.” — Dr. Sean M. Wells, DPT, PT, OCS, ATC/L, CSCS Owner and PT, Naples Personal Training, LLC


The common mistakes people make to lose weight section is decent, however I felt it was lacking. People make a lot more than just 3 common mistakes, which are crash dieting, too much exercise and checking weight too often. I'd like to see this section more fully covered because a better understanding of why these are bad, as well as other mistakes that weren't even mentioned, are going to help people make better choices in the future. Overall this is an important section that was sort of glossed over.
Crash dieting can backfire and actually make it harder to lose weight—not to mention increase the chance you'll gain it back when you start eating again. At the same time, if you're cutting out calories without assessing and ensuring you're still eating the right ones, "you actually stop losing weight," Cederquist says. You can also feel weak, lightheaded and fatigued, like you're running off fumes. Not exactly the best motivation to hit the gym.
It can actually help you cut back on calories. That's because capsaicin, a compound found in jalapeno and cayenne peppers, may (slightly) increase your body's release of stress hormones such as adrenaline, which can speed up your ability to burn calories. What's more, eating hot peppers may help slow you down. You're less likely to wolfed down that plate of spicy spaghetti —— and therefore stay more mindful of when you're full. Some great adds: Ginger, turmeric, black pepper, oregano, and jalapenos.

I am a meso-endo body type and I need to lose body fat!! I have been doing HIIT and weights, but lately I have been thinking of starting power walking instead of HIIT(jump squats, burpees, pushups, jumping lunges) and weights which I think they bulk me. I have quite muscular legs and wide upper body but it is covered with excess fat. I eat very healthily, low carb mostly, but I cannot lose fat. Should I stop doing hiit and strength type of training and focus os power walking? Also, is running going to help? I am afraid that by not doing any resistant training I will slow down my metabolism and not burn fat. But I have very strong legs I feel that I need to lose fat in order for them to seem toned. I have excess fat all over my body, what should I do??? Thank you in advance!!

95. Embrace Kaizen – Kaizen is a japanese concept that means constant improvement. Every day, strive to be better than you were yesterday. It’s not about being perfect, it’s about getting stronger, running faster, jumping higher, and moving more efficiently. This concept can also be applied to your diet. You don’t have to overhaul your lifestyle, but instead make small, maintainable changes over time.
Will your body tell you when its exhausted of your caloric deficit? I have lost fat at the rate I am happy with, but recently I started to feel faint, dizzy, and experienced headaches while working out. Each set I completed I am winded, and feel that I will faint at any second. I still want to lose fat but I feel that if I maintain a 20% caloric deficit I will surely start fainting.

This study took 2 groups of women and put them on similar hypocaloric diets (meaning below maintenance level so that a caloric deficit was present). The only difference between the diets of the two groups is that 43% of one group’s daily calorie intake came from sucrose (aka table sugar), while just 4% of the other group’s daily calorie intake came from sucrose. Guess what happened? Despite one group eating a VERY high sugar diet and the other group eating a VERY low sugar diet, they both lost equal amounts of weight and body fat. Why? Because it’s NOT the source of your calories that causes fat loss, it’s the presence of a caloric deficit.
For even more impressive effects on body composition: aim for exercise forms which elicit a positive hormonal response. This means lifting really heavy things (strength training), or interval training. Such exercise increases levels of the sex hormone testosterone (primarily in men) as well as growth hormone. Not only do greater levels of these hormones increase your muscle mass, but they also decrease your visceral fat (belly fat) in the long term.
A 2012 study also showed that people on a low-carb diet burned 300 more calories a day – while resting! According to one of the Harvard professors behind the study this advantage “would equal the number of calories typically burned in an hour of moderate-intensity physical activity”. Imagine that: an entire bonus hour of exercise every day, without actually exercising.
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