Okay, I am a bit confused now, can you explain further? I was all on board with some of your other posts, mainly where you indicate that the best workout to maintain strength in a deficit is through strength training; you indicated that it may not be the most efficient at burning fat, but that it will certainly maintain the absolute most amount of muscle, while letting a caloric deficit to take care of fat loss (this is exactly what I have been focusing on, it seemed quite logical). In regards to hard strength training, focusing on low-moderate reps, I am still finding myself tired, worn out, fatigued, etc. at the same rate as my previous training cycles – in which I was deloading every 4th week – in other words, “working my ass off” as you state in your other post. So, maybe a little more explanation is needed here to clarify for me. Isn’t a deload every 4th (maybe 6th) week suggested even if your strength training focus is down in the 4-8 rep range? I would think that the need for a deload is associated more with the effort you expend in the gym, not what you eat outside of the gym – or even the progress in the gym. Further (with absolutely no consideration for science or anything else – so I could be way off) it even seems to me, that when your body is in a deficit and you are focusing on strength training, maybe the need for a deload would be more apparent (from a symptom standpoint, joint health, fatigue, etc.). No? Thoughts?
"When we’re lacking in sleep, our body’s hormones get thrown off balance which can impact our hunger levels the next day. We all have two hormones that affect our appetite: ghrelin and leptin. When we don’t get enough sleep, our ghrelin levels (the hormone that makes us feel hungry) rise, and our leptin levels (the hormone that makes us feel full) drop. This means that when we’re awake, we tend to eat more but feel less satisfied. Try going to bed a little earlier than usual to avoid this imbalance and remember to remove any distractions that might prevent you from nodding off."

If your BMI places you in the obese category, it's time to lose weight, according to the most recent (2013) weight management guidelines from the American Heart Association and other professional organizations. Weight loss is also recommended if you're overweight and have other risk factors for heart disease, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, or a waist circumference greater than 35 inches (88 centimeters) for women and 40 inches (102 centimeters) for men.
To lose belly fat in 2 weeks, remember that you can't target specific parts of your body when losing weight, so you'll need to lose fat in general if you want to see a reduction in belly fat. For 2 weeks, focus on eating mostly healthy foods like lean protein and fruits and vegetables. In addition to eating healthy, do high-intensity cardio exercises for 30-45 minutes every day for 2 weeks. You should also do strength-training exercises, like lifting weights, every other day.

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