I have been on a very good diet for a while, a while as in at least the last five years. Initially I lost 10kgs but now I’m just stuck – to be lean I would still have to lose another 5kgs, I’m a little squishy. Obviously I have a cheat day, possibly once a week. I also work out 4 days a week, with the odd surfing expedition in there as well. I was on 1000 – 1200 calories a day. Can you help?

Use an adult energy needs calculator to estimate your calorie intake needs; then subtract the 500 to 1,000 calories for weight loss. For example, a 28-year-old woman who is 5 foot, 9-inches tall weighs 175 pounds and is lightly active -- less than an hour a day -- burns about 2,400 calories daily. She'll burn about 2 pounds of fat in a week if she eats 1,400 calories daily, or 1 pound a week if she eats 1,900 calories a day.
If not bothersome I’d like to ask you a specific question that I don’t believe I’ve seen on your website. I know the sole factor of fat loss is calorie deficit and am happy with the weight loss I’ve achieved in the past 9 weeks. I will attend a friend’s wedding for a week next week and don’t imagine I will be able to maintain my current diet. I’ve read from other sources discussing how you should “SLOWLY” increase your calorie consumption to avoid your body storing fat. I will certainly not eat 4,000 calories during my trip but my question will be if it’s OK for me to jump back to “maintenance level” calorie consumption or you would recommend me doing “15% Deficit on Day 1, 10% Deficit on Day 2…etc.”?
2. Boxing: I let my clients do boxing as I feel that it’s a great way to pump up your heart rate and increase sweating. Higher the heart rate the more calories they’ll be burning. Usually I instruct my clients to do one minute of punches or combinations usually on boxing pads but can also be done on a punch bag followed by 30 seconds rest. Usually I repeat this exercise several times until my clients are fit. Then I let them hold the plank in between rounds as an active rest.
If you are sleeping so much that you forego exercise and normal daily activity in favor of staying in bed, then yes, you can gain fat. However, getting between 7-9 hours of sleep per night (or however much you need to not feel tired -- everyone's needs are different) is part of being healthy overall. There is actually evidence that getting too little sleep can contribute to unwanted fat gain, because it increases levels of cortisol (your body's stress hormone) which can disrupt your metabolism. So, you should aim to get a good night's sleep always, and especially if you are trying to reduce fat.
Snacking can be a gray area for weight loss. Really think about whether a snack is necessary before eating it. A low-calorie snack can be a good option before or after a work out or if you're feeling very hungry and there's more than two hours until your next meal.[11] To keep your metabolism moving and keep yourself full, you should be eating every three to four hours. That might mean multiple small meals or three meals with snacks in between.
Coolsculpting is a nonsurgical way of getting rid of fats in the midsection areas. Some people try to get rid of belly fat through diet to no avail. Cool sculpting involves applying cold on areas like the belly so that the fat cells can freeze. Once they freeze, they die, and your body absorbs the body cells with time. While this treatment can cause some discomfort in the midsection, it helps to reshape your body by getting rid of belly fat.
Leafy Greens – Help you feel satisfied longer, boost your metabolism and turn off your hunger receptors. You will eat less and lose more belly fat just by increasing your leafy greens! They’re low in calories and high in fiber, making them the perfect weight loss food. Not a fan? Try one of our yummy green smoothies. Examples include spinach, romaine lettuce, kale, bok choy, arugula, chard, and mustard greens.
If you’ve read about these 21 healthy snacks to help you lose weight, you would know that nuts are recommended to be one of the best options to snack on, by experts. Nuts are high in fat but they could prove to be extremely effective in helping you lose belly fat. A research conducted at the Reina Sofia University Hospital reveals that participants who consumed a rich diet of mono-saturated fats in the form of healthy nuts over a period of 28 days, experienced lesser weight gain as compared to their counterparts who consumed saturated fats. They also improved their insulin sensitivity in the process.
“The best thing you can do for your belly is to give up processed foods. A study in the journal Food Nutrition Research found that our bodies burn only 50 percent as many calories digesting processed foods as they do real foods. So it’s like eating twice as much, even if the calories are the same!” — Mark Langowski, celebrity trainer and author of  Eat This, Not That! for Abs
“If you’re feeling deprived by your diet, build in a cheat meal at least once a week in which you can indulge guilt-free. Doing this will help you avoid viewing certain foods as ‘off limits,’ which will help you crave them less.” — David Zinczenko, author of  Zero Belly Cookbook: 150+ Delicious Recipes to Flatten Your Belly, Turn Off Your Fat Genes, and Help Keep You Lean for Life!
There’s no way to sugarcoat this: Your TV is making you fat. It prevents you from being active, gives you the munchies, and makes you distracted while you’re eating. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that people who ate in front of the TV consumed 10 percent more than they normally would. Eating while distracted disrupts your satiety signals, so shutting off all your electronics while munching will help you stick to your portions, and feel full.
Try interval training. Interval training is where you do really intense activity for only a short period of time, and then moderate or light intensity work for the majority of the time. Scientists have found, in several studies, that people who do interval training actually end up exercising for shorter periods of time and burning more calories than people who go at medium intensity for their whole workout.[7]
Some experts argue that instead of dieting leading to long-term weight gain, the relationship goes in the other direction: People who are genetically prone to gain weight are more likely to diet. To test this idea, in a 2012 study, researchers followed over 4,000 twins aged 16 to 25. Dieters were more likely to gain weight than their non-dieting identical twins, suggesting that dieting does indeed increase weight gain even after accounting for genetic background. The difference in weight gain was even larger between fraternal twins, so dieters may also have a higher genetic tendency to gain. The study found that a single diet increased the odds of becoming overweight by a factor of two in men and three in women. Women who had gone on two or more diets during the study were five times as likely to become overweight.
Spoon Guru nutritionist Isabel Butler (MSc, ANutr) recommends that “the best way to reduce weight and maintain the weight loss is by simply eating a balanced and healthy diet, without refusing yourself particular foods… If you do cut out foods, you need to make sure your diet is still balanced and you are getting the nutrients your body needs from other sources.”  

Liz Applegate, director of sports nutrition at the University of California, Davis, said she recommends a diet that is about 20 percent protein (about 60 to 70 grams, or 2 to 2.5 ounces, per day), spread across all three meals. This recommendation agrees with findings from a study of people in the National Weight Control Registry who have lost at least 30 lbs. (13.6 kg) and kept it off for at least a year. An analysis of 900 people in this registry showed that about 18 to 20 percent of their daily calories came from protein. This would be the equivalent of eating 6 ounces of Greek yogurt at breakfast (17 grams of protein), 3 ounces of salmon for lunch (21 grams of protein) 1 ounce of nuts for a snack (7 grams of protein) and 3 ounces of chicken for dinner (19 grams of protein).


Nuts. It’s very easy to eat until the nuts are gone, regardless of how full you are. A tip: According to science, salted nuts are harder to stop eating than unsalted nuts. Salted nuts tempt you to more overeating. Good to know. Another tip: Avoid bringing the entire bag to the couch, preferably choose a small bowl instead. I often eat all the nuts in front of me, whether I’m hungry or not.
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